What’s Herbs Got to Do with It? - Madagascar salvages Equitorial Guinea from COVID19

What’s Herbs Got to Do with It? - Madagascar salvages Equitorial Guinea from COVID19
  • Madagascar - |Coronavirus Cases as at Today :132| Deaths :0 | Recovered : 94 |
  • A consignment of 11,5000 packets weighing 1.5 tons of Covid Organics (CVO) – a form of herbal tea was shipped to Equatorial Guinea
  • 3 African countries Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Guinea Bissau have shown interest in the CVO.
  • Malagasy President Andry Rajoelina officially launched the CVO, a herbal concoction claiming that it can prevent and cure patients suffering from coronavirus.
  • The drug has been developed by the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research.

 “We must move forward at our own pace, we must above all have confidence in ourselves and the therapeutic virtues of nature. For nature and man are one.”

In the race against time to find a cure for COVID-19, Madagascar began very early on a dual therapy protocol based on chloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin, in association with treatments derived from traditional knowledge that emphasizes the use of medicinal plants.

Equitorial Guinea has looked east and west and has concluded that home is the best for a cure to the pandemic as its African neighbors are awaiting a vaccine approved by the WHO while numbers continue to rise

Equatorial Guinea is the first recipient of  Covid Organics (CVO) a herbal concoction, touted to cure coronavirus patients.

Madagascar has donated the herbal potion that it claims cures coronavirus or COVID-19 pandemic patients to Central African country of Equatorial Guinea, local media reported on Thursday.

A consignment of 11,5000 packets weighing 1.5 tons of Covid Organics (CVO) – a form of herbal tea was shipped to Equatorial Guinea. Out of this, 1,500 packets are for curative treatment and 10,000 for preventive healing.

“Equatorial Guinea wanted to be the first country to recognize and use this remedy discovered by Malagasy researchers. And we hope that health cooperation between the two countries will be further strengthened, " said La Verite, a newspaper quoting Mitoha Ondo'o Ayekaba Equatorial Guinea's deputy minister of health.

Equatorial Guinea, with a population of 1.3 million has 315 confirmed COVID-19 cases so far, with one death, and nine recoveries, according to figures compiled by the US-based Johns Hopkins University.

Last week, Malagasy President Andry Rajoelina officially launched the CVO, a herbal concoction claiming that it can prevent and cure patients suffering from coronavirus. The drug has been developed by the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research.

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Rajoelina has directed to distribute the drink free of charge to the most vulnerable and sell it at very low prices to others. Politicians have been urged to donate to R and D in the cure for COVID19. It is also mandatory to sip the brew before retiring home for the day.

"This herbal tea gives results in seven days," said the 45-year-old president, who also urged people to use it as a preventative measure…Schoolchildren should be given this to drink... little by little throughout the day,"

However, a statement sent to the BBC by WHO said that the global organisation did not recommend "self-medication with any medicines... as a prevention or cure for COVID-19."

According to information from the Presidency of the Republic of Madagascar, three African countries Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Guinea Bissau have shown interest in the CVO.

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(President Andry Rajoelina of Madagascar with The President Of Ghana Nana Akufo-Addo Far Right)

 

Thirsty in the abundance of water?

The launch of Covid-Organics (CVO) in Madagascar has raised many questions. But for Marcel Razanamparany, president of the Academy of Medicine, this initiative highlights the work of IMRA researchers, who conducted the clinical study. And whose founder, Albert Rakoto Ratsimamanga, has always advocated the connection between modern and traditional medicine.

In the race against time to find a cure for COVID-19, Madagascar began very early on a dual therapy protocol based on chloroquine and the antibiotic azithromycin, in association with treatments derived from traditional knowledge that emphasizes the use of medicinal plants.

With Madagascar’s rich biodiversity and the central role of its traditional practitioners, the decision was made to promote traditional medicine.

Read Also- 32 herbal drugs to be tested for COVID-19 cure in Ghana.

COVID-Organics was produced after careful analysis of  the use of artemisia in China against the coronavirus

Under presidential demands, and faced with the promises of chloroquine and the use of artemisia in China against the coronavirus, the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA) and the National Pharmacology Research Centre joined forces to conduct studies and set up a research protocol on this plant already known for its virtues against malaria.

This led to the development of Covid-Organics, an improved traditional remedy made up of artemisia and other endemic medicinal plants, such as ravintsara.

Association of Traditional and Modern Medicine

Abundant on Malagasy soil, the artemisia annua has already been the subject of more than twenty studies in Madagascar where it was introduced in 1975 by Professor Albert Rakoto Ratsimamanga to fight against malaria. Its medicinal form is already marketed in pharmacies.

Potential of the endemic flora

The development of Covid-Organics is a perfect illustration of the credo of Professor Albert Rakoto Ratsimamanga, whose research focused on the combination of traditional and modern medicine.

Regarded as the pioneer of science in Madagascar, this researcher – who was at the origin of some 350 scientific studies – declared:

“We must move forward at our own pace, we must above all have confidence in ourselves and in the therapeutic virtues of nature. For nature and man are one.”