The UK lures patients with GHC 4,462 to take part in coronavirus vaccine trials

The UK lures patients with  GHC 4,462 to take part in coronavirus vaccine trials
  • Healthy volunteers aged 18-55 are being sought for the trials, which are expected to last six months, with Imperial's trials set to begin in June.
  • The vaccine, called ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, is made from a harmless chimpanzee virus that has been genetically engineered to carry part of the coronavirus.
  • VOLUNTEERS are being offered up to £625 to take part in Britain's coronavirus vaccines trials.

 

A potential coronavirus vaccine being developed at the University of Oxford will be trialled on people from Thursday, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said

Imperial College London, Bristol Children's Vaccine Centre and University Hospital Southampton have advertised for people to take part in trials as the world races to find a vaccine for the deadly virus.

 Health Secretary Matt Hancock has announced a boost of £20million to fund the clinical trials, as well as £22.5 million to Imperial College London for its vaccine research.

Speaking at the Downing Street press briefing yesterday, Mr Hancock said: "I can announce that the vaccine from the Oxford project will be trialled in people from this Thursday," he said.

"In normal times, reaching this stage would take years and I'm very proud of the work taken so far.

"At the same time, we will invest in manufacturing capability so that if either of these vaccines safely work, we can make it available for the British people as soon as humanely possible."

Work on the vaccine, developed by clinical research teams at the University of Oxford’s Jenner Institute and Oxford Vaccine Group, began in January.

Professor Saul Faust, director of the NIHR Southampton Clinical Research Facility at UHS, said: "There are not currently any licensed vaccines or specific treatments for COVID-19.

"But vaccines are the most effective way of controlling outbreaks and the international community has stepped up efforts towards developing one."

Around 80 groups around the world are trying to develop a Covid-19 vaccine as scientists work around the clock.

What is the purpose of the human trials?

The University of Oxford says it is testing a new vaccine against COVID-19 in "healthy volunteers".

The vaccine, called ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, is made from a harmless chimpanzee virus that has been genetically engineered to carry part of the coronavirus.

Work on the vaccine, developed by clinical research teams at the University of Oxford’s Jenner Institute and Oxford Vaccine Group, began in January.

Professor Saul Faust, director of the NIHR Southampton Clinical Research Facility at UHS, said: "There are not currently any licensed vaccines or specific treatments for COVID-19.

"But vaccines are the most effective way of controlling outbreaks and the international community has stepped up efforts towards developing one."

Around 80 groups around the world are trying to develop a COVID-19 vaccine as scientists work around the clock.

Professor Sarah Gilbert, who is leading the Oxford trials, says she is "80% confident" the vaccine her team is developing could be ready by September.

Scientists in Oxford have set a target of one million doses of the vaccine by September.

The trials come as Britain's death toll from COVID-19 rose to more than 17,300, with another 828 deaths in 24 hours.